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First day toolkit.

start-new-jobI have worked with a lot of people on their first day on the job.   I have had a few first-days over the years myself.   The first day can be nerve-wracking, confusing and a bit overwhelming.   There are a lot of names, rules and general information pieces to remember.   Recall not just your first day on the job, but your first day on your FIRST job.

Parents are a good source of expertise regarding the first day.   Here are some things to teach your kids about their first day so they don’t turn into the type of worker that has a lot of “first days” and never seems to get how it all works.

Basic housekeeping information:     Talk to your kids about gathering the information they need ahead of time.   They may not think to ask about where to park (if they drive), if they need to bring a lunch, or which particular person they should check in with.   The whole process is foreign and it is important to gather some of the basic, logistical pieces of information that will make them less confused.   Here are a few more things worth discussing:

  • Does the company have a cell phone policy?   Talk to them about putting their phone away at work.
  • What is the dress code?   Tell them start out conservative until they learn the real environment.
  • Get there early.   Many people don’t factor in traffic, accidents or other delays.
  • Get some rest.   New jobs are exciting.   And it is not the time to stay up late or skip breakfast the next day.   Just like you talk to your kids about the proper approach to school testing, do the same for their first job.

A little anthropology:   Anthropology is the study of humanity.   This includes culture.   Each workplace has its own culture and behaviors of the humans that work there.   This can be one of the trickiest parts of fitting in at a new job.   Conversations with your kids about how to slowly join a new culture are valuable and sadly, often missed.   Many people, even seasoned workers, don’t understand how to ease into a new culture without quickly upsetting or even offending those that are already there.   Here are some ideas of how to do this:

  • Observe the workers first.   Listen more than you talk.   Take your time before you offer opinions or comments.
  • Look for unspoken rules or traditions.   These subtleties can make a team cohesive, but they won’t be written in print.   They are little things like using only company logo’d coffee mugs or not making a mess of the newspaper in the kitchen.   Being a bull in a china shop on your first day will not win over the longer term employees.
  • Avoid cliques, gossip and office politics.   Seasoned employees might like to quickly recruit new employees to their agendas.   Educate on how to be watchful of such ploys and recommend staying clear and avoiding commitments right out of the shoot.
  • Don’t EVER bad mouth the company or a previous employer…or anyone.   The world is small in this regard and you never know who might know someone else or who you might offend.   Keep opinions to yourself.

Safety: Many jobs are not in an office and job sites can have safety concerns.   This is one area where is it ok to speak up, ask questions and voice safety concerns. Many first time workers don’t understand safety protocols.   The good news is that most employers are very safety conscious.   However, it doesn’t hurt to talk about on-the-job safety.   Make sure your kids understand that if they do get hurt, they have the right to report it and cannot be adversely affected for reporting an injury.

Discussions that cover these topics at home will give your kids a huge advantage when they move into the working world.   Questions will come up and parents are wonderful resources.   Start the conversations.

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First job toolkit.

First Job

First Job

Over the years I have witnessed countless first-job employees struggle through new hire documents.   Many of them have a parent with them or are texting or calling every other minute to help them understand what they are signing.   Federal tax forms, drug tests, policies and badges are confusing and even a little scary.   Most young adults that get their first job are hesitant to ask questions and fear looking naïve.

Typically one, if not both parents or care givers have a job outside the home, or did at some point.   The new hire process we remember as an inconvenience is something foreign to our children.   Even if it has been many years, think back to how overwhelming it felt the first time.

This is a great opportunity to talk to your kids as they approach the age of a first job and what they will experience in the scary HR office.   And, in case you forgot, here is a quick checklist:

  • I9 – The form I9 is a federal form that proves a person is eligible to work in the United States.   All employers are required to have employees complete this form.   If you haven’t had a job change in the last few years, the form has changed and can be viewed here.  A list is included of acceptable documents, which are often a driver’s license or school ID and a social security card.   It is up to the employee to choose the acceptable documents and an employer cannot mandate which ones are presented, as long as they meet the criteria on the list.
  • W4 – I have yet to meet a first time employee that had a clue about what to claim for tax status.   Please do your kids a favor and download the W4 from the IRS site and help them decide what to claim.   Also let them know they can change what they are claiming at any time.
  • Drug tests – Many employers require an initial drug test before an employee can start.   Drug testing is a complicated topic but if it is a private employer, most circumstances will allow them to conduct drug screens.   In my experience they are typically urine tests and can be done either at the job site or the candidate is sent off site to a lab.   Talk to your kids about the process and ensure them it is typical and not to feel nervous (unless they are doing drugs).   It may feel embarrassing but is often part of the process of getting a job.   There is a lot of information on the Department of Labor website regarding employment drug testing.
  • Internships:   Very few internships qualify to be unpaid.   The unpaid internship requirements and definitions can be found here, as part of the Fair Labor Standards Act.   If your child comes home saying they have been offered an unpaid internship, question them further.   An internship can be done anywhere, as long as they are getting at least minimum wage.   I have come across many employers that try to use this as a loophole to free labor.
  • Independent contractor:   Another tactic some employers will try is to tell a person they are hired as an independent contractor.   The IRS has a strict 20 point checklist to truly define independent contractor status.   Please review this at home if this topic comes up.
  • Handbook:   Employers spend a lot of time, money and resources to have a good employee handbook.   Sadly, many employees don’t take the time to read them and either get caught in a policy violation or ask questions that are spelled out for them.   Stress the importance of this piece and encourage them to read it.   If it is their first job, ask them to bring it home and go through it with them.   I’m sure your kids will have questions.
  • Reporting time worked:   Most first jobs are paid by the hour (nonexempt).   It is critical your kids understand that reporting time worked needs to be accurate.   Some first timers could get lured into to checking in for a friend that is running late or encouraged to falsify their time for an extra hour here or there.   Help kids understand that doing such things will get them fired quickly, with no recourse or unemployment.   Conversely, also help them understand that employers have to pay them for time worked.   Meaning, they can’t “flex” their schedule one week to get out of paying over time in a different week.   As long as the employer is in the private sector, they have to follow the laws of the labor board.   Each state is different in this regard but information is easily accessible by searching your states labor board website.
  • Honesty:   Depending on each situation, your child may have something they are not proud of that could come up during the new hire process.   It might include being fired, inappropriate social media pictures or maybe even a misdemeanor.   Most employers have plenty of experience with all of this and honesty is the best policy.   With internet access, it is nearly impossible to hide something.   Tell your kids to convey something negative in the most succinct and honest way and confidently explain how they have improved.   The honesty strategy will offer more successful outcomes than not.

Taking a few minutes here and there to prep your kids for the logistics involved in their first job will put them leaps and bounds ahead of their peers.   They will appreciate it when they realize that they are better prepared and unsurprised at what to expect.

 

 

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